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  • 13.09.17 Posted in Steam Systems By Margie Moschetti

  • 05.09.17 Posted in Steam Systems By Margie Moschetti

    Valves are primarily used in piping systems to stop, divert, or regulate the flow of fluids.

    Valve types can be broadly categorized based on their function such as:

    Isolation (Stop) Valves:

    These valve types are used to stop the flow or isolate a portion of the system until it is required to provide flow downstream of the valve.  The basic design requirement of stop valves is to offer minimum resistance to flow in its fully open position and to provide tight shut-off when fully closed.

    Regulating Valves:

    Regulating valves are used in piping systems to regulate the flow of fluid.  Flow is varied depending on the signal sent based on required parameters like pressure, flow rate or temperature.

    Back-Flow Prevention Valves:

    These valve types allow flow only in one direction and prevents flow in the reverse direction.

    Pressure Relief Valves:

    Pressure relief valves are used in a system to prevent excessive build-up of pressure above the system design pressure.

    In the context of valve types, steam traps and strainers are related devices that are used extensively in piping systems.  Steam traps are used to discharge condensate from steam piping/steam heating equipment.  

    For more information on valves installed in piping systems, browse our eBook Library “Steam Distribution and Primary Equipment Handbook.”

  • 08.12.15 Posted in Steam Systems By Edward Moschetti

    Steam systems can sometimes be a challenge to determine how well they are operating from an energy, cost, and performance point of view. Here are a few signals to help you determine how well your system is operating.

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  • 08.12.15 Posted in Steam Systems By Edward Moschetti

    One of the most difficult applications to properly drain condensate involves calendar rolls. A typical corrugating machine with two single facers and a triple stack heater will have up to 18 rotating rolls to be drained to provide for a hot machine-typically 350 F on the calendar roll surface.

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  • 08.12.15 Posted in Steam Systems By Edward Moschetti

    The Engineer of the Toffee Factory and I were discussing the merits of using a Pilot Operated Steam Pressure Reducing Valve, (PRV). "So for accurate control of Steam Pressure, I just need to use a Pilot Operated PRV," stated the Engineer, "or should I go for sophistication with electronic control?"

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  • 08.12.15 Posted in Steam Systems By Edward Moschetti

    While you were reading this information on line, a 1/2" steam trap in your facility just failed and started to blow live steam. Not an earth shattering event.

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  • 08.12.15 Posted in Steam Systems By Edward Moschetti

    We receive many calls with these common denominators -

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  • 08.12.15 Posted in Steam Systems By Edward Moschetti

    We receive many calls from customers seeking help in trouble shooting equipment problems in steam, air, water, and vacuum systems. Many problems can be resolved by knowing the system pressures at various points.

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  • 08.12.15 Posted in Steam Systems By Edward Moschetti

    All of the following are equal to one million BTUs.

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  • 08.12.15 Posted in Steam Systems By Edward Moschetti

    Lifting condensate from a steam trap is an important consideration. All steam traps will lift condensate with the amount of lift possible a function of the pressure at the inlet of the trap.

    28" = 1 PSI

    A column of water 28" high will exert a pressure of 1 pound per square inch at the base of the column. Conversely, it requires 1 psi of pressure to lift a column of water 1'.

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